antarctica

Packing 101: Packing for Antarctica

It’s not that I don’t like the cold, it’s really that I don’t know it. I’ve lived in coastal California most of my life, so my idea of a chilly day is one where the high is 50F. Not exactly well-equipped for kitting out in preparation of visiting the polar regions. Luckily for me, early on I stumbled upon the TripAdvisor forums, more specifically the Antarctic forum. So. Much. Information. Amongst all the advice and tips there were some really handy items like a pre-made Google docs packing list. Special advice for photographers about gloves that enabled me to actually manipulate the camera controls.

In my experience, the ship was kept very warm but there will be cold drafts so plan on having some warm slippers or shoes to even it out. I bought some knockoff Uggs before the trip and I LOVED them. They were great for rushing out on deck to spot the whales, and warm enough that even the coldest drafts didn’t give me much trouble. Highly recommended.

The Gullet, South of the Antarctic Circle

It wasn’t quite as cold as it looks here, really.

The great thing about wearing several layers is that you can add/remove as needed to achieve your preferred temperature. This is easier if the layering items are of different weights. What does that mean?

  • Lightweight: silk or polypropylene
  • Midweight: thicker polypro/merino
  • Heavyweight (aka Expedition weight): yet thicker polypro, merino, fleece
  • Fleece (also comes in different weights from Polarfleece 100 to 300)

You want to have an assortment of these things in different weights so that you can mix and match according to the weather and your own cold sensitivity. I did learn on this trip that I am not very cold sensitive at all really, so your mileage will almost certainly vary. The temperatures can range from 20F to 50F, and the wind can be incredibly cold and biting.

Neko Harbour, Antarctica.

It actually got to near 50F that day, the penguins were panting in the heat.

For a fair weather shore excursion  (eg: no heavy wind, no snow or rain):

Feet: one pair silk socks, one pair heavyweight socks

Body: lightweight polypro longsleeve top, lightweight polypro leggings, midweight fleece top and bottoms.

Hands: midweight gloves (mine did not have the touch-screen capacity but the weight is the same)

Bonus: neck gaiter or buff plus lightweight wool knit hat (I have very thick hair so having a cold head is never an issue for me)

Top Layer:  Quark-provided parka and  North Face waterproof trousers (this is what you always wear ashore, regardless of what’s underneath). I removed the button-in fleece from my parka as that just made it too bulky for me and just wore it above my regular windproof fleece jacket. Quark loaned us muck boots for the expedition and they were very thick rubber and I found them quite warm.

Comfort quotient: Delightful. The only thing that was ever noticeably cold was my chin, cause the gaiter kept sliding down. Of course, your mileage may vary. The thing to remember is that for many North Americans, the summer temperatures in Antarctica will be WAY warmer than what you normally contend with in winter.

My friend Amy photographing the Adelies

My friend Amy here not long before the katabatic winds started up and the temperature dropped precipitously.

Questionable weather shore excursion (snow falling or imminent, windy)

Feet: Midweight socks plus heavyweight socks

Body: midweight polypro longsleeve top, midweight polypro leggings, midweight fleece top and bottoms.

Bonus: neck gaiter or buff plus Icelandic wool hat (incredibly warm)

Comfort quotient: nice. Occasionally the weather would change and I’d have to unzip my top fleece layer or even take it off and stick it in my backpack, but the choice was there which was nice

Zodiac Excursion in Gerlache Strait, Antarctica

Beautiful day for a zodiac excursion in Gerlache Strait, Antarctica

Zodiac Excursions (when you don’t move very much so cannot generate your own heat)

Feet: Midweight socks plus heavyweight socks

Body: midweight polypro longsleeve top, heavyweight polypro leggings, midweight fleece top and bottoms.

Bonus: neck gaiter or buff plus Icelandic wool hat (incredibly warm)

Comfort quotient: Well, hate to say it but your butt will get cold. Sitting for a while on the rubber raft’s edge will slowly sap a lot of the warmth from you. Nothing to be done about it really. Once you’re back on the ship you’ll warm right up.

So what did I end up bringing in the end? My expedition clothing consisted of:

  • 1 pair waterproof trousers
  • 2 pair lightweight long underwear bottoms (Patagonia capilene)
  • 1 pair midweight long underwear bottoms
  • 1 pair heavyweight long underwear bottoms
  • 2 lightweight long underwear top (Patagonia capilene)
  • 1 midweight long underwear top
  • 1 heavyweight long underwear top
  • 1 lightweight fleece (North Face)
  • 2 mid-weight fleeces (North Face)
  • 2 pairs fleece trousers (often worn on ship instead of jeans or whatever)
  • 3 pairs gloves: silk liners, midweight liners, ski gloves
  • 2 gaiters (light and medium weight)
  • 2 pair lightweight socks (silk liners, actually)
  • 2 pair midweight socks (ski socks)
  • 2 pair heavyweight socks (heavy wool “hunting” socks)

It sounds like a lot, but most of it packed up pretty small. I also employed some space-saving bags where you press the air out (useful for the fleeces).

While on the ship I had some fleeces and some cotton trousers for lounging around in. A couple of v-neck wool blend sweaters and a pashmina-like shawl if my neck was feeling particularly cold. The one thing to keep in mind here, is that is not some fashion show, not some fancy dress-for-dinner cruise. No one cares what you’re wearing, so bring only what you need. The ship has laundry of course, so you don’t need to have too large a wardrobe. One thing I will say is pack a large ziploc bag for those waterproof trousers, cause nothing stinks up a suitcase like penguin guano. You have been warned. I had to wash them twice when I got home to get the funk out.

One final note: this is a great opportunity to search out deals at those online retailers that sell last-season’s colors and closeouts for hiking/camping gear. Most everything I got was from these retailers and it saved me a TON on money. So I had bright turquoise long underwear? Who cares!

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Editing Basics: how engaging is this image?

There’s a mysterious thing that happens with images: sometimes, the light we capture on the sensor (or on the film) somehow is missing the one thing that made the moment so spectacular. It’s not out of focus, it’s not terribly under exposed, the composition is okay, there’s just something…. not there.

The thing that’s not there of course, is your feelings the moment you took it. That is something that can be very elusive. The viewers of an image are not cold, they are not windblown, they are not out of breath from hiking up to that ridge, they are not among exciting new friends. All of that is basically impossible to convey in a static image, and that may well be what makes that image special to you.

The very hardest thing for any photographer to do is to look at their images objectively. It’s maddeningly difficult sometimes. I didn’t really understand this mechanism until I worked for Galen Rowell. There were a few images that he absolutely adored, had marked as his Best Images, and yet they were… just a picture. Not a great picture in any objective sense. Most of the time he was spot-on at knowing which images of his would really resonate with people, but every once in a while, he was wrong. There was just no way we would know what it was like to be in that dark, smoky Tibetan house high in the Himalaya, to meet these sweet gentle people who were so kind, and whose picture he took at that moment while the fire burned brightly in the corner.

This is one reason why I think it’s a bad idea to do any sort of real editing while you’re on a trip. You’re too close to the action, emotionally, to tell if a picture is really good or not. There’s time enough when you get home for all that. And your pictures will be better for it.

So when you sit down to edit, ask yourself these things about every picture you’ve taken:

  • Is it engaging to look at?
  • Is it quickly understandable?
  • How long do you want to look at it?

Is it engaging to look at? – Is the composition flat or dynamic? Is there a tension to the composition that will engage the viewer?

SVA_0779The texture of this berg is interesting, and I like how it’s reflected in the calm water beneath it, but it’s just sitting there, really. Compositionally this is a bust. There’s nothing dynamic happening here. There’s nothing technically wrong with this image, it’s just not that interesting.

 

SVA_0858

This is much more engaging. First of all the texture is really fascinating: this ice looks like frosted glass! And the deep grooves in the iceberg give a diagonal line to the composition that really help the picture stand out. Add to that the smaller grooves at a perpendicular angle to that and all of a sudden this is much more interesting compositionally than the one above. And the color, who knew one iceberg could have that many shades of blue?

 

Is there enough going on inside the frame to allow you to spend some time with it, or is it the kind of picture where a single glance is all you need?

ANT_3016

This one is really borderline to me. There’s enough going on visually, but the composition is missing any dynamism. Nice to have brash ice, but the ice floes are too far away and your eye has to kind of reach in order to get any of the detail in the mid-to background.

 

 

ANT_2728

THIS is what I’m talking about. The brash ice (and even a bit of pancake ice!) litter the foreground.  The ice floes lead your eyes into the frame, and the light  and clouds give lots of varied color and texture to the scene.

 

This is essentially separate from the question above, and is a lot more difficult to explain: do you want to just stare at it?  The longer you want to stare at an image the better.

SVA_0918

This image definitely has texture, but it’s all pretty much the same texture. Perhaps the light was a bit too flat, or this was just not the best iceberg to shoot. You’re kind of at the mercy of nature at times like this; there’s only so much you can do to position an iceberg for a portrait at its best angle. Maybe we need to just go find a different iceberg.

 

 

SVA_3950

This is much more like it. The ship in the distance gives some interest, and the triangular shape of the berg leads the viewer’s eye right there. The berg itself has both bizarre dappled texture and is run through with thick bands of moraine which gives some depth of color. The water is rippled by a breeze and that mimics the texture on the ice. The light that day was relentlessly flat but since the iceberg itself has so much texture it still works.

 

Let me give you another example of the “stare at an image” idea:

ANT_6125

This is one picture from Antarctic that I’m absolutely in love with. The texture of that snow, the light hitting it at an angle like that to really  show off the texture and the sculptural nature of it… oooh. Just love it. This is one image I can just stare at. It’s not that complicated of an image, there’s not that much going on compositionally, but the way the different elements (the side light, the color of the light, the yellow light paired with the deep blue clouds) really pops.

 

Oh, and yeah, I’m totally obsessed with ice and icebergs now. I know it. I won’t try to hide it.

Polar Photography Tips

Or, why I’m so cavalier with my gear and how it sometimes bites me in the ass.

1. Condensation is a function of dew point, not a matter of temperature change, so the humidity is what matters, not the cold.  In the polar regions, unless its actively raining it’s probably going to be pretty dry, both inside and outside the ship. Therefore going to the trouble of putting your camera and lenses in ziploc bags before bringing them inside is probably not going to be necessary; I’ve always just left them in a closed-up camera bag for an hour or so and I’ve never had a problem with condensation.

2. You’d be surprised how wet your gear can get with no ill effects. I’ve shot in drizzle countless times and never had any problem with anything getting fogged up or shorting out. That being said, it’s good to have some kind of rain cover with you at all times in case it starts really coming down. Sometimes, a ziploc bag with a holes cut for the camera strap is enough. Sometimes you want one of these rain covers. When it’s just spitting, you can get by with adding a lens hood and keeping a chamois handy to dry off the front element and the barrel of the lens.

Wandering Albatross in the snow

3. Bring backups. There are no camera stores on the Antarctic peninsula. I rarely keep my lenses in any kind of bags or cases (aside from the camera bag itself), and while I was reorganizing gear in my camera bag one day, one of my lenses rolled off the bed and hit the floor. The filter cracked and the filter ring was so bent by the impact that I could not get it off. Good thing I had a backup – I just tossed that lens into a drawer, grabbed the backup and I was good to go. Once I got home I took it in to a camera store and they got the filter off. The front element was fine; the filter took the impact… which is why every one of your lenses should have a filter on it, especially on a boat.

4. On a moving ship, an image-stabilized lens is a lifesaver. My recent trip to Antarctica is the first time I’ve really shot with one, and I was amazed at how sharp some images were – even of birds flying behind the ship.

Giant Petrel

5. Don’t be afraid to change lenses. Yes, every once in a while why you’re doing that some bits of dust are going to blow in and get on your sensor. It happens. Just don’t be that guy on my recent trip who only ever seemed to have his 100-400mm on his camera. You will miss shots that way. You’ve paid all this money to get there, now you’re missing shots cause you don’t want to change lenses. It’s a cryin’ shame. At one point, one of these long-lens guys commented; “I just gotta wait til that iceberg is a little further away!”

6. Bring sensor cleaners.  When you get a bit of dust in there on your sensor after changing lenses, you can use one of these swabs to clean off the dust. They work like a charm and are easy to pack.

7. Bring some really thin gloves, eg: liners like these, and slightly heavier gloves like these: both enabled me to tweak controls on my camera with gloves on, which was essential. I really found I rarely needed more than one of these on anyway – it was not as cold as I’d expected.

8. Stay out on deck.  I spent hours on deck just watching the landscape roll by, and it enabled me to get a lot of great shots I would not have gotten otherwise. When you spy that great iceberg from the lounge, its too late. By the same token, carry your camera with you to meals. It can be a bit of a drag in a crowded dining room, but when they spot that whale it’s great not to have to run down to your room to grab your gear.

Iceberg

9. Bring two camera bags. To Antarctica I brought a backpack (and dry bags) for our shore excursions because you need to have two hands free to get in and out of the zodiac. At the last minute I decided to bring my regular shoulder bag too. I was so glad I did — it’s so lightweight and easy to have at your side all the time while on board.

10. Look at your pictures (especially to check for spots on the sensor), but don’t really edit during the trip. You want to take enough of a look to figure out if you screwed something up, or have some setting wonky on your camera, but you don’t want to get so deep into editing that you miss additional photo opportunities while you’re doing that. There’s gonna be plenty of time to edit once you get home.

11. The last zodiac is the best zodiac. On most of our landings, I was one of the last people back to the ship.  Given how changeable the weather is down there, you really never know what is going to happen. One day on South Georgia, as I was slowly making my way back to the landing site, the sun started to come out, and sea turned a light turquoise blue. It was gorgeous. The expedition team literally had to chase me into a zodiac so we could leave for the next location. But the pictures I got in those last few minutes are great.

South Georgia. St. Andrews.

 

Poll: Help me pick which images to submit to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest, part 1

Which ones should I pick? Click on any of the images above to open the gallery.

I’d like to submit three images from this trip, plus a few others from other trips as well (to come in a later post). I’d like to submit a total of 5 images to the contest. The entry fee is $15 per image, so I can’t go too crazy.  If you have any write-in candidates, please let me know in the comments!

 

Thanks for your help.  Though I do have a lot of experience editing photos, sometimes it is hard to separate out one’s emotional connection to an image from it’s actual worth as a picture. Hearing others’ opinions is really helpful.

Top Ten Things I Did Not Expect On A Trip To Antarctica and South Georgia

Come for the penguins, stay for the fur seals!

I had done a lot of research before this trip, so I knew quite a bit about what to expect and what would await me there. Years ago I worked for a photographer who visited South Georgia and Antarctica several times, so I had seen tons of  pictures from these places, and could recognize many of them. But even with all that, there were definitely some surprises. Here’s my top ten:

1. This is the best whale watching cruise you’ve never heard of. I’ve seen my share of whales. I’ve gone whale watching on the California coast, on Vancouver Island in Canada, even in Iceland. But even I was shocked at the number of whales we saw. Not only the variety of different species, but the sheer number of whales we saw was incredible.

Line of fin whales in the Scotia Sea

2. Antarctic fur seals are incredibly territorial and downright aggressive creatures. Before our first landing in South Georgia we got a detailed briefing on how to deal with them (basically: stand your ground), but I was shocked to see tiny pups going after us as if they were great big bulls. It was cute when it wasn’t sort of terrifying. Those teeth are sharp.

Fur seal
3. We were really busy. Between the daily landings and the lectures on history and wildlife and geology, meals and being exhausted from being out in the fresh air all day, I had basically no time to read or properly edit my images while on the ship.

4. Just how close to the wildlife you get. The rule is that you need to stay 15 feet away from the animals, keeping in mind that they are free to come as close to you as they’d like… and that is often pretty darn close.

Penguin

4. Doing photography every day for 3 weeks really hones your skills. I’m not sure why this had not occurred to me, but in the course of one of these longer journeys, if you’re using your camera every day and taking at least a quick peek at the results, you’re going to get better. Not only will using your camera become more automatic, but you will be better at evaluating the unique light conditions that occur down there.

Iceberg

5. My shipmates were younger than I expected. When I was in Dallas waiting for my flight to Buenos Aires, I saw the typical cruise crowd all heading down to their South American cruises. Most of them were well over 70, their tickets and IDs hanging on those pockets you wear around your neck. But not on our ship. The group seemed to be about half over 60 and half under, which gave us a good mix. We also had ~ 30% Australians, which of course made the whole thing more fun.

6. The wind is pretty much incessant. If your eyes are sensitive to wind and tear up a lot, make sure to bring wrap-around style sunglasses to help protect them. It will make a big difference. Or be like me and just keep your camera in front of your face all the time.

Wind
7. Getting in and out of zodiacs is easier than I expected… and after learning how to do it in the swells of South Georgia, the landings on the Antarctic peninsula were downright easy, as the water is so much more protected. By the end of it we were all experts, sliding towards the front and swinging our legs over the edge and landing in the water in one smooth motion, like we’d been doing it all our lives.

Zodiac
9. Running up and down the stairs to get to and from your lower-deck cabin is pretty good exercise. My apartment is on the third floor, so running up and down stairs is not new to me, but I was surprised at how by the end of the trip, I was able to race up all 5 flights from my cabin to the deck above the bridge without missing a beat.

10. The weather was fascinating. Between the come-out-of-nowhere katabatic winds (and attendant lenticular clouds) and the thick cumulus clouds that seemed to hover just feet above the water, I was constantly amazed by it. There were thick fogs that dissipated in minutes, mist, snow, sleet, rain — we saw pretty much every kind of weather at some point. I loved it.


Clouds

One thing that doesn’t surprise me? People ask if I want to go back. The answer is simple: In a heartbeat.

Taking a month off for the trip of a lifetime, part 2

Saving money is a bitch. It’s tedious. It’s weeks eating a bag lunch at work, months without buying new books or clothes, and over a year of watching all your outgoing expenses like Scrooge. It takes discipline. And so boring! So just post some pictures on the fridge of where you’re going to go and dig deep. You can do this. Every dollar saved brings you closer to your dream trip. One trick that a lot of people use is to set up a separate savings account, just to make it easier to mentally set aside the money. Then, you can set up automatic deposits from your paycheck and you never even see the money, making it a lot easier to save. And when you think about saving, don’t forget all the little bits of money that go through your hands that often just get spent: every bonus, every tax refund, every thing you’ve been wanting to sell on craigslist but have been too lazy to do, all of it.

It’s a good thing I was home-bound saving money, cause there’s a lot to research for a trip like this. I live in California, so I’m not exactly outfitted for polar travel. The travel companies provide general packing lists of what to bring, but there is just so much I didn’t know about this stuff.

Somehow I stumbled on Trip Advisor and their forums. The Antarctic Travel forum specifically is a treasure trove of information on gear and what to expect. Just what weight long underwear do you need? Wait, there are different weights of long underwear? Which gloves do photographers prefer? What the hell is a sock liner? All those questions and a thousand more are answered there. This was an incredible resource while I was planning this trip — one thing that might not readily occur to you is this: there are no stores in Antarctica. You forget something and you’re SOL*. So the more you plan, the better.

The forums also contain lots of fascinating trip reports from people who’ve traveled there already. There are even threads for specific voyages, so I was able to “meet” a few people on my trip before I even left. The trip reports that previous travelers post there are also great. If you’re having a moment of weakness, wondering if it’s all worth it, read one of those. You’ll be bouncing off the walls with excitement.

Upclose and personal

In the end, I gathered my courage and told work about the trip 6 months out. I had 2 weeks of vacation, but would need to take another 2 weeks as unpaid leave. Given the hesitant, halting way I broke the news to my boss, I’m sure he thought I was going to either quit or tell him I was pregnant. If you look at it that way, one month off is nothing! It could be so much worse! In the end he was fine with it, because we had 6 months to prepare a plan to keep everything rolling while I was away.

I know, I know: You have a million reasons why you couldn’t possibly do this. You have responsibilities! A job! Bills! Yes, well we all do. That’s where the planning comes in:

What about work? At work I cross-trained a few coworkers to handle the urgent day-to-day stuff I take care of, and they took turns doing it while I was gone. Of course there are some people who maybe wouldn’t be comfortable doing this. There is a risk of course that work will find they don’t need you to do the job after all. I wasn’t really concerned with this, not because my coworkers couldn’t do the job – they did great  – but because the job you do isn’t just about the tasks you take care of, it’s also about the experience you have and familiarity you have with how to handle problems that come up every day. That can’t be taught. So stop worrying so much.

What about bills? You need to set up automatic payments to fire while you’re gone, anticipating any gotchas like car registration coming due. About half of my bills are on auto-pay, half aren’t, so I just had to set up a few things and try and remember if I would start a new cycle of car insurance payments or whatever while I was away. Just sit down for an hour and plan it all out.

What will you do with your cat? I have a dog and a cat. I took the dog up to my Mom’s house 4 hours away to stay there while I was gone. I pestered a friend into taking the cat to his house for the month. They wanted to “test drive” having a cat for a while anyway, so in the end that worked out okay too. Cats get weird when you take them out of their environment, but he settled down after a few days.

What about your apartment?  You can either get a friend to house-sit for you or you need to stop the mail and let the neighbors know that you’re going away and not disappeared down a ravine somewhere. Leave emergency contact numbers (for your parents, for the ship’s sat-phone and the expedition company) with them in case something crazy happens like a fire or someone breaks in.

You have to clean out the fridge before you go — you don’t want to come home to a biohazard. Please, please remember to take the used coffee filter out of the machine the morning of the day you leave. I made that mistake once.

Turn off the heat if you can to save some money while you’re gone (it doesn’t freeze here so leaving it off in winter is not a worry). Maybe set a lamp on a timer so it looks like something is happening in your place in the evenings.

Call the insurance company to get them to okay you picking up two months’ supply of prescriptions so you won’t run out while gone. If you need glasses, definitely throw a backup pair into your packing box. A man on my trip broke his and it was a drag.

See? You’re almost done planning this out! You just need to buy a few things!

 

Iceberg, Gerlache Strait

A few people on the Antarctic forum posted actual Google doc packing lists, which were really helpful — reminding you to bring things like pepto bismol and bandaids and dramamine. I edited one for myself and made adjustments for all the photography gear I would need.

I relied on my Amazon shopping cart extensively. I didn’t buy everything from them, but when I thought of something I would need, I just added it there to remind me. This made it really easy to remember all the little things (extra-strong sunscreen, duct tape, sensor-cleaning wipes for my camera, etc) I needed to get. When I bought them, I just threw them all into a big box in the corner of my living room– a suggestion made on the TripAdvisor Antarctic forum, by the way–  which made packing really easy cause I just had to grab what was in the box.

Consider buying a new camera and a couple of longer lenses for getting really sharp wildlife images. Get vibration reduction (VR) lenses if you can – anything you shoot from the ship will be suffering from the movement of the ship and the shuddering of the engines, so it can make a huge difference. You can easily spend as much on lenses as you did on the trip itself, so consider renting them instead. A company like LensRentals makes getting your hands on that long lens a lot cheaper. They even sell insurance in case something happens to it.

At the beginning, all the work and all the preparation that I was going to have to do for this trip seemed Herculean, but it wasn’t really. Break it down into parts, keep lists, start early so you have time to remember anything you might forget. In the end I was possibly over-prepared. There were some things I brought that I didn’t use, but most of it I did and majority of the things I brought fit the bill perfectly.

So, was it worth it in the end? Absolutely. The trip was spectacular… we saw everything I’d hoped we’d see and lots I wasn’t even expecting. I learned so much about Antarctic wildlife and history. In the coming weeks I’ll post about the different locations we visited and what we saw there.

*The ship did have a small shop, where you could get a few essentials like deoderant and a hat, but the selection was limited and several things sold out quickly.

“F8 and being there”



Sunset over ice floes, near Adelaide Island, Antarctica.

 

It’s a quote attributed to everyone from Ansel Adams to a nameless photo editor, and even Weegee.

But it remains some pretty good advice. It means simply: You have to actually be there to get the picture. Seems simple enough. The reality though, is that depending where you are, this could mean waking up hours before dawn, staying out late in the evening stamping your feet trying to stay warm, or like in this instance, missing dinner.

We had had an amazing day slowly making our way south through the first-year ice in The Gullet, a small space between Adelaide Island and the main part of the Antarctic continent. At around 4pm the thickening ice caused our captain to turn around and head back north. We had spent all day on deck photographing in the incredible sunny weather, and everyone was beat.

I had sat down to dinner with some friends at around 7:30, and was just finishing my salad when my eyes were drawn out the side window. The light, it was getting interesting. Really interesting.

“I’m really sorry, you’re gonna have to excuse me. I have to go take pictures now.” I usually had my camera bag nearby for whatever whale or iceberg came into view, so I just grabbed it and headed out.

In the course of about an hour, I shot probably 50 different scenes. There was the light on the far mountains (above), Crabeater seals resting on ice floes, the sun setting through milky cirrus clouds over the broken-up pack ice, and even a Snow Petrel in flight (below). The light was amazing, changing quickly and causing me to run front and back, side to side, all over the ship to get a shot of whatever had just caught my eye. It really was an “F8 and being there” kind of situation: there was a great picture everywhere you looked.

 

Snow Petrel in flight

I spent at least an hour out there,  running around on deck photographing in all directions, while nearly everyone else was eating dinner. When I came back in my friends were just finishing their dessert. The waiter had kindly put a dome over my pasta so it would be there when I returned.

The pasta was still a bit warm, so wolfed some down. Was it worth it? Absolutely.